Seeking a researcher to conduct semi-structured interviews with clinicians and LGBTI people

Study: LGBTI Comorbidity study Background: LGBTI people experience a number of specific risk factors for substance use and mental health problems, including elevated social stigmatisation and social stress, lower levels of parental support, and higher rates of abuse and victimisation. LGBTI people have higher rates of substance use and mental health problems, and are more... Continue Reading →

Thinking about SWASH as a community-engaged research project: the feedback

I'm writing a series of blogs about SWASH, a repeated cross-sectional survey of the health and wellbeing of community-connected lesbian, bisexual, queer (LBQ) and other non-heterosexual identifying women in Sydney. It is run by a collaboration of researchers (myself and colleague Rachel Deacon) and ACON Health (Australia's largest community health organisation specialising in LGBTQ health). I've been... Continue Reading →

Changes in social networks are associated with lesbian, bisexual and queer women quitting smoking

We've just published a paper in Drug and Alcohol Review based on formative survey research we conducted for the Smoke Free Still Fierce smoking cessation campaign (ACON developed with funding from Cancer Institute NSW). We produced a community report on the survey but this is a more sophisticated analysis that aimed to understand the differences... Continue Reading →

Australia’s longest running regular survey of lesbian, bisexual and queer women’s health is collecting data…

  Every two years since 1996 the SWASH survey has been asking lesbian, bisexual and queer women in Sydney about their sexual health, mental health, experiences of violence and abuse, tobacco and drug use, alcohol consumption, and health service engagement. In 2010, the survey started running biennially in Perth (as WWASH), and in 2014/5 we... Continue Reading →

SWASH 2016 is out!

We're launching the 2016 SWASH report on the health and wellbeing of lesbian, bisexual and queer women engaged with the Sydney LGBTIQ communities, at the LBQ Women's Health Conference tomorrow. Send it to your friends, your GP, and your MP! Check out past reports and more in-depth analyses.

‘Except as required by law’: Australian researchers’ legal rights and obligations regarding participant confidentiality

Researchers’ promises of confidentiality are often easily and genuinely made. However, our experience in research ethics review (Julie through an NGO-run ethics review committee; Anna through formally constituted university and hospital human research ethics committees), in qualitative research and in teaching qualitative research ethics has led us to think about the limits of these promises.... Continue Reading →

Earning the LGBTI (or being deliberate when describing our research): Reflections on the 9th National LGBTI Health Conference

I've just attended the 9th National LGBTI Health Conference in Canberra. The conference organisers had a very progressive approach to communicating with delegates - for the few months leading up to the conference they sent out short announcements (blog posts) about the papers to be presented, along with the more usual updates with delegate information.... Continue Reading →

How can ethics committees judge whether researchers are competent to conduct qualitative research?

[check out some more thoughts at the end of the post] I’ve just taught a session on ethics in qualitative research, part of an intensive course designed to give attendees an appreciation of the philosophical and ethical issues underlying research involving human participants. There was good representation from those who called themselves qual researchers, those... Continue Reading →

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